Residential Plumbing

Residential Plumbing
Plumber installs macerator pump in own basement bathroom

Plumber installs macerator pump in own basement bathroom

Problem: Plumbing contractor Don Frederick Sr. needed to add a bathroom to serve his Amsterdam, New York, home’s basement, out of which he ran his business. He had just one problem — the walk-out basement was below the home’s drainline, making it impossible to install a conventional bathroom.

Solution: Frederick’s first instinct was to take the conventional route of installing a sewage ejection pump. However, he recalled various problems he had encountered while using this method in the past. Instead, he chose to install the Saniaccess3 above-floor plumbing macerator from Saniflo, which comes with two easy-to-open panels atop the unit, providing ready access to the internal components for servicing. The macerator grinds waste into a slurry before pumping it horizontally or vertically to a home’s or building’s drainline.

Result: By choosing above-floor plumbing over a sewage ejection pump, Frederick estimates savings of roughly $1,500 and more than a day’s worth of labor. 800/571-8191; www.saniflo.com.


User-friendly boiler installed in tight footprint

Problem: Chris McLaughlin, lead installation tech at Coppersmith Plumbing Company in Grand Junction, Colorado, was recently called to replace a boiler in a home where Coppersmith had installed the original boiler years ago. “I wanted to try out a new firetube boiler,” says McLaughlin. “I’ve installed a few firetubes from two or three different manufacturers over the years, but we install mostly Burnham-brand equipment.”

Solution: “When I learned that U.S. Boiler Co. had introduced a new K2 Firetube, I decided to use it on this application,” says McLaughlin. The old natural gas system was under a flight of steps in the garage, feeding three zones of fin-tube baseboard. McLaughlin found that space constraints weren’t an issue for the 85 mBh K2 Firetube. The ability to pipe the supply and return out of either the top or bottom of the boiler was an advantage. The unit has a dimpled, stainless steel vertical firetube heat exchanger and is available in six sizes from 85 to 270 mBh. A 155 mBh combination version is also available.

Result: “Everything installed smoothly except for the outdoor reset,” says McLaughlin. “The layout of these houses makes it tough to fish the wire where I want it. I’ll be ordering the wireless ODR kit next time we’re called to this neighborhood.” The boiler proved to be easier to install than he had expected. 717/397-4701; www.usboiler.net.



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