Business Success Starts With the Right Mindset

Most people approach life from either a perspective of “abundance” or “scarcity.” The category you fall under can greatly impact your company.

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As a new year dawns, many small-business owners are making plans, adjusting strategies, and resolving to be as productive and as efficient as possible for 2021.

There are plenty of ways to position your company for a successful year, and one of the most foundational steps of all is to develop the right mindset.

There’s one concept that may help: Do you operate your business from an abundance mindset, or are you more focused on scarcity? If you’re unsure of the answer, keep reading to discover what an abundance mindset is, and how it can guide you toward greater success in the new year.

Defining the Abundance Mindset

The leader who operates with an abundance mindset understands that there is plenty to go around. This leader approaches life and business from a place of confidence and contentment; they are satisfied with what they have and what they are capable of, knowing it’s enough for them to achieve what they want. The leader with an abundance mindset doesn’t see failures or setbacks. Rather they see opportunities.

The opposite of this is the scarcity mindset. Leaders who have a scarcity mindset see the world through the lens of what they lack. These leaders never feel like they have enough. Because of this, they tend to shy away from big challenges or opportunities, assuming they do not have the resources or ability to rise to the occasion. Additionally, leaders who have the scarcity mindset never take the time to develop new skills or talents because they assume that these new skills will never be enough for them to attain their goals.

Your Mindset Impacts the Entire Team

Choosing an abundance mindset over a scarcity mindset matters for your personal development, but it also impacts your employees.

Consider it from this point of view: If you have a scarcity mindset, it means you spend a lot of time fretting over the things you lack, whether that means time, talent, money, or other resources. You worry about big challenges or setbacks and assume that failure is inevitable.

This can’t help but trickle down to your employees, who may find that they lack the confidence required to handle big challenges or to take important risks. Simply put, employees are never going to be inspired to work hard, try new things, or set lofty goals if they have a leader who is fearful, anxious or paranoid.

Because the business leader’s mindset has such a huge impact on the team, it’s usually easy to look at the company culture and draw a reasonable inference about whether the leader operates from a point of abundance or from scarcity.

Do your employees talk openly about seeking new opportunities? Do they have confidence in facing big challenges? Do they actively seek to learn new things? Do they have security in their jobs? These are usually signs that you’re leading with an abundance mindset.

Forming an Abundance Mindset

If you’d like to have an abundance mindset in the coming year, there are a few simple strategies you can use to attain it.

  • Make curiosity your first response to any new idea or challenge. Ask out loud: How can we make this happen? How can we change our circumstances or improve our results? How can we attain our goals?
  • Seek counsel and mentorship from other leaders who exude positivity and confidence; when you face a problem or a crisis, get guidance from someone who has an abundance mindset.
  • Be intentional in flipping your point of view. If something happens that seems like a problem or a setback, try asking yourself how you could see it as an opportunity instead.

Developing an abundance mindset may take time and discipline, but it is well worth it, empowering you to lead your business forward with real confidence.  

About the Author

Amanda E. Clark is the president and editor-in-chief of Grammar Chic, a full-service professional writing company. She is a published ghostwriter and editor, and she's currently under contract with literary agencies in Malibu, California and Dublin. Since founding Grammar Chic in 2008, Clark, along with her team of skilled professional writers, has offered expertise to clients in the creative, business and academic fields. The company accepts a wide range of projects; often engages in content and social media marketing; and drafts resumes, press releases, web content, marketing materials and ghostwritten creative pieces. Contact Clark at www.grammarchic.net.



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